Supper 5 p.m. | Meeting 6:00 p.m.

April 11 • Alerus Center • Grand Forks

79th Annual Meeting

YOUR VOICE POWERS
NODAK ELECTRIC

YOUR NODAK NEIGHBORS

BLAINE THOMPSON

BLAINE THOMPSON

Commercial Accounts Supervisor

Nodak News

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Be Fire Prevention Smart, Don’t Get Burned!

Electricity usually makes life easier by powering kitchen appliances, gadgets and electronics we use for entertainment. However, that same electricity contains the potential to destroy homes and take lives. Electric fires are more destructive than any other type of fire, and they are twice as deadly. Safe Electricity has the following information to help you keep your electric system safe.

  • Consider getting an electric inspection of your home, especially if it is an older home or you have never had an inspection.
  • If an electrical fire starts in your home, do not use water to extinguish it. Water conducts electricity, and you could get an electric shock. Use an extinguisher that is approved for use on electrical fires.
  • Flickering lights, warm, cracked or sparking outlets all indicate electrical problems.
  • If circuits trip, fuses blow or someone gets a shock, your home has an electrical problem. Get an electric inspection.
  • Do not overload outlets, use an extension cord as a permanent wiring solution, or use light bulbs that are not rated for the socket.
  • Contact an electrician about installing an Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI). An AFCI monitors the flow of electricity in your home. If the flow of electricity is irregular and could cause a fire, the AFCI shuts off electricity.
  • Inspect electrical plugs and cords annually. If they are frayed or cracked, repair or replace them. Do not place cords under rugs or staple or nail them to the wall.

Source: safeelectricity.org

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Those Annoying Blinking Clocks

Don’t you just hate those blinking “12:00” clocks? Manufacturers could build in a backup system to avoid this, but that would increase the cost and you may not want to pay the extra amount for the device.

The blinking is often set into motion by the cooperative’s line safety devices used to avoid frequent and prolonged outages. The devices are called oil circuit reclosers. They operate by opening the circuit for an instant when the line is contacted by an object such as a squirrel, racoon, tree limb blowing in the breeze, etcetera. The object usually frees the line on the first blink. If not, the recloser will operate two more times. If the line is still not clear, the device will shut down the power until a serviceman clears the line and closes the oil reclosers.

Thus, the safety devices either avoid outages or shorten the outage time and decrease the area affected. They also prevent damage to the line, which is another way of keeping electricity at the lowest possible cost. When the clocks blink 12:00, keep in mind the manufacturer is trying to save you money, and we are trying to provide you dependable service at the lowest possible cost.

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Transfer, New Hire

Jesse Sturman, apprentice lineman, transferred full time to the Construction crew from the Grand Forks crew.

 

 

 

 

New hire Trent Edens joins the Cavalier crew. Trent started as a seasonal apprentice lineman with both the Devils Lake and Michigan crews. Trent is from Bemidji, Minn.

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Nodak Electric Cooperative

Nodak Electric Cooperative is dedicated to being an efficient provider of quality electric service with leadership that demonstrates the highest regard for its members/owners.


To report an outage call
800-732-4373 or 701-746-4461

2018 Annual Report

Read more about Nodak Electric Cooperative's year-in-review

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