Summer Cooling Tips

With summer officially here and the temperatures edging higher with each passing day, here is a list of ways to help keep you cool while saving money — and energy!

• Set your thermostat to 78. Go higher, if the humidity is low enough and you feel comfortable. Turning a thermostat down to cool a room quicker doesn’t work, by the way — it makes the A/C run longer, not colder.

• Drink lots of water. This is good practice, anyway. Cold drinks lower your body’s core temperature and cool you down quickly.

• Draw your drapes. Keeping your blinds, shades and curtains closed — particularly on the west side of the house — a practice that helps keeps heat from getting inside in the first place.

• Turn off unnecessary heat-producing devices. Incandescent light bulbs are a big heat generator. Shut down electronic gear when you’re not using it.

• Use the microwave. Conventional cooking dumps heat in the house, but microwaves cook the food directly.

• Wash and dry clothes when the day is cool. Do laundry early in the day and late at night. Don’t forget clotheslines: they generate no heat in the house.

• Skip your dishwasher’s dry cycle. Rack your dishes and let them air dry instead.

• Open the bathroom window when showering. Vent heat and humidity outside, rather than back into the house. Obviously, you don’t want to put on a show for the neighbors. If you have privacy concerns, open up the window after dressing. Keep the bathroom door closed.

• Run your air conditioner fan on low. This is particularly helpful in areas with high summer humidity. The low air volume helps your A/C dehumidify.

• Keep heat-producers away from your thermostat. Don’t allow a closely located TV or water heater to convince your thermostat that it’s hotter than it really is.

• Check your refrigerator settings. The fridge takes heat out of your food and transfers it to your kitchen, so be sure you’re running it efficiently. The refrigerator works best when set between 37 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Put the freezer around 5 degrees.

• Turn off your furnace pilot light. You can always re-light it next autumn.

• Close the fireplace damper. Don’t send cool air up the chimney. If your fireplace has a glass door, shut it.

 

Source: mnn.com

 

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August 21st, 8:48 am

Minnkota, dignitaries celebrate completion of historic line
Minnkota
Power Cooperative’s Center to Grand Forks 345-kV Transmission Line
commemoration event was scheduled to be at the Prairie substation southwest of
Grand Forks on Aug. 18, but threatening weather forced the event inside.
"The
project has been delayed over the years as a result of weather, so it's only
fitting today that we have the announcement of its completion inside instead of
outside," said Mac McLennan, Minnkota president & CEO. "That's
true to form as it relates to this project."
McLennan’s
comments came during the celebration of the 250-mile, $353 million line, which
is the longest project ever built inside the borders of North Dakota and
Minnkota's largest investment in transmission facilities.
Several
dignitaries, including U.S. Sen. John Hoeven, R.-N.D., and U.S. Rep. Kevin
Cramer, R-N.D., spoke during the event at the Grand Forks Alerus Center.
"Minnkota's
new transmission line will help to provide efficient power for our growing communities
and economy," Hoeven said. "This project is a good example of the
energy infrastructure investments that we need to build a brighter energy
future for our state and our nation."
The
250-mile line began service Aug. 7, transporting energy from the Young Station
to the Prairie substation and providing grid reliability and long-term growth
needs to the northern Red River Valley and beyond.
Other
dignitaries who spoke included North Dakota Public Service Commission Chair
Brian Kalk, PSC Commissioner Randy Christmann and Ryan Nagle, representing U.S.
Sen. Heidi Heitkamp.
Mike
Hennes, the project manager for the Center to Grand Forks line, applauded
Minnkota workers for supporting and guiding project contractors such as
Tri-State Drilling (foundations) and Michels Power (structures and line
stringing).
“The
Minnkota staff need to be recognized for the extra burden carried by many who
this project added to their existing maintenance and construction project
workload,” Hennes said. “My hat is off to all who helped guide this project to
completion.”
Russ Okeson, vice chair of the Minnkota board, said the project
will add stability and reliability to not only Minnkota’s energy system, but
also improves the economic health of the region.
“When we think about the cooperative principles and values
that all cooperatives were founded on, this generation can truly be proud of
the contribution this project will add to that legacy,” Okeson said.
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August 15th, 7:37 pm

Power has been lost to two substations serving customers in the Tokio and Aneta areas. Crews are responding to restore power. ... See MoreSee Less

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